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WKO Forms &
Kata Rules

SCORING RULES – FORMS AND WEAPONS

 

Section 1 MAXIMUM DEVIATION RULE

 

Since the high and low scores are not dropped when three officials are used in forms and weapons, the Maximum Deviation Rule (See Article VII) limits the impact of a single judge’s score to control with his/her high or low score the outcome of placement. The judge’s score that is between the other two judges scores (middle score) is considered the middle score. Once that score has been determined, the other two judges cannot be higher or lower than .02 points of that middle score. If their score is higher or lower than .02, they must adjust their score up or down accordingly to that .02 maximum deviation. See complete Maximum Deviation Rule (See Article VII) for more details.

 

Section 2 DELAY OF TIME PENALTY

A .01 point, per judge, will be deducted from the offending competitor’s final score each minute the competitor is not ready to compete. If a competitor is still not ready to compete after 3 minutes, he/she will be disqualified.

 

Section 3 TIME LIMIT

Time starts with the competitor first step, in the ring. Competitors have used two initial launch points;

1) the corner of the ring; or

2) just outside of the corner. In either case, once a competitor takes their first step time will start. Should a competitor delay their start, the following will occur:

a) The Centre Referee shall issue a First Verbal Warning to the Competitor by stating: “PLEASE BEGIN YOUR PERFORMANCE.”

b) If Competitor fails to comply with the Centre Official’s First Verbal Warning, a Second Verbal Warning shall be given by the Centre Official stating: “SECOND WARNING, PLEASE BEGIN YOUR PERFORMANCE.” A Second Verbal Warning may result in a .01 deduction, per judge.

c) All Referees must reach a unanimous decision that the Competitor’s failure to enter the Competition Ring unreasonably delayed his/her performance prior to any penalty being assessed. Each divisional form or weapon routine must be three

(3) minutes or less. Four

 (4) minutes is allowed for each form or weapon routine in the Night Time Finals. Each team form and/or demo routine as a four (4) minutes time limit.

Any competitor, team form or team demo that goes over the allowed time limit is automatically disqualified.

 

At the 2 minute 45 second mark (3 minutes 45 seconds for overall grands, Demos, Team Forms and Team Weapons) of a competitor’s form, the timekeeper will shout out “FIFTEEN SECONDS”.

 

Section 4 ORDER OF COMPETITION

Once the final call for the form and weapon divisions has been made at ring side and the divisional seeds have been taken out (see seeding rules) the competition cards will be collected and shuffled thoroughly. The competitor cards will then be drawn randomly for the order of competition. As per the Relative Ranking Rule the judges will look at all the competitors before they give their final scores. This rule allows judges to adjust their scores if they feel other competitors that come later are better or worse than the competitors who came first (See Relative Ranking Rule Sheet). If a competitor arrives late (the division is ready to start, but the 1st competitor has not started), the late entry must compete first, including seeds; refer to Section 1.06 – Late Entry.

 

Section 5 SCORING RANGES OF FORMS AND WEAPONS

The Scoring range should always be discussed by the centre referee and judges before the division starts.

a) TIES: If there is a tie for 1st thru 4th place, the majority of the judge’s scores determine the winner. If there is not a majority of judges for one competitor and one judge or more gave the same score for the tied competitor, the judge that gave the same scores must be asked to make a decision and break the tie.

b) All judges must make scoring decisions by giving different scores to the competitors.

c) Ties for 5th through 8th place are never broken. They will remain tied and all will receive points and awards. If there is a tie and there is not a majority judge’s decision and no judge gave the same score to any one competitor, the tied competitors will compete again and be scored again.

 

Section 6 DROPPING A WEAPON

If a competitor drops his/her weapon during the eliminations, they will not be scored and will be disqualified. They are encouraged to complete their form but are not required to continue. If a competitor drops their weapons during the finals, they are not disqualified unless they drop twice or do not finish their weapons form. (See Section 8.07 for complete dropped weapons rules). If a competitor drops their weapon and it goes out of bounds or hits anyone, they will be disqualified and will not receive any score.

 

Section 7 ALTERING A WEAPON

It is the intent, of this rule, to enforce the use of any weapon in its original design, functionally, and capabilities, Alternating the weapon(s) in any matter, including but not limiting to the use of magnetic weapons, will be deeded as altering the weapon and the competitor scores may be lower.

 

Section 8 WEAPONS / FORMS PENALTY

A weapon(s) or any portion of a weapon should not exceed the boundary of the ring, including an imaginary line that goes vertically from the boundary floor line upward. Further, a competitor (weapons and forms competitors) should not exceed the imaginary line. Should the judges see a weapon / competitor exceed the imaginary barrier, the competitor score can be downgrade or the competitor can be disqualified with a majority of the judges agreeing on the disqualification. The intent of this rule is the safety of competitors, spectators and the judges; also, known as group. It is not intended to be applied unilaterally; rather in situations where the exceeding of the imaginary boundary could provide a risk to any of the group. For example, the weapon / competitor exceeds the boundary: – The weapon / competitor goes between or over the groups body or head; or – The weapons / competitor hits anyone, in the group, who is outside of the ring. Penalty – Striking / hitting anyone within the group – disqualification – All other penalties – .05 deduction by each judge.

 

Section 9 STARTING A FORM OVER

If a competitor starts his/her form over because of a memory lapse or any other reason due to his/her own negligence, he/she may perform the form again.

a) The officials will score as though there was not a mistake, but the centre referee will instruct the judges to subtract .05 points from the competitor’s final score.

b) The three-minute time limit will start over.

c) A competitor can only start over one time for scoring.

d) If a competitor has to start over, not due to his/her negligence, he/she will not be penalized on the start over.

 

Section 5.10 TIE-BREAKER PROCESS

The process for breaking ties follows the same order regardless of the number of judges used for the division or the type of division (eliminations, runoffs, grands). The methodology always follows this order:

1) Majority of judges – this is the majority of the total number of judges in the division; not based on score but rather on who the judge placed higher (most ties can be broken using this rule)

2) Total score – this is the adding back of scores dropped when using five or seven judges and totaling the total score (not applicable to divisions with only 3 judges)

3) Re-run the tied competitors – the re-run would only include the tied competitors who remain tied after applying rules one and two The following information will provide additional details and examples as well as explaining how automated/electronic scoring systems are utilized.

Calculation of Scores Judges must score every division using the WKO scoring system even if there are only 2 competitors or teams. The “pointing technique” is no longer allowed to eliminate potential confusion as to which competitor or team one or more judges are selecting. Divisions with five or seven judges: In scoring of competitors with Five or Seven judges, the high and low scores are dropped before totaling the remaining scores.

 

For example; a competitor received a 9.97, 9.99, 9.97, 9.98 and 9.99. One of the 9.97’s and one of the 9.99’s will be dropped (not counted) and the competitor score will be 29.94 (or 24 totaling only the last digit). This is done for all competitors to determine final placing. Maximum Deviation Rule is not used with 5 or 7 judges. Divisions with three judges: All three judge’s scores are totaled to arrive at the competitor’s total score. However, the Maximum Deviation Rule (See Article VII) is applied so that outlying scores are limited.

 

The Maximum Deviation Rule (See Article VII) requires that scores must be within .02 of the middle score and it is only used with 3 judge panels. This is done for all competitors to determine final placing. Tied Scores If a tie exists with 2 or more competitors, then the methodology listed above will be applied. The number of judges in the ring will determine how the tie breaking methodology will be utilized. The calculation will change based on the number of judges, but in all cases the tie breaking methodology will be followed to determine the winner. Where a computer system is used, the methodology will be automated. Once the methods to break the ties are established then the steps necessary for each level, eliminations, runoff and overall grands will be defined below. The methods are: – Majority of the judge’s. This is always the first method that will be performed to break a tie. In this process, each judge’s score will be compared to determine the number of judges that gave the highest score to each tied competitor.

For example: o Judge 1 gave competitor A 9.99 and competitor B 9.98 – competitor A gets 1 point o Judge 2 gave competitor A 9.99 and competitor B 9.98 – competitor A gets 1 point o Judge 3 gave competitor A 9.97 and competitor B 9.99 – competitor B gets 1 point The overall score is tied, but competitor A wins on two out of the three judges scores and thus has 2 points to 1 point for competitor B; competitor A gets the win. – Judge Determines the Winner. This occurs when the electronic/automated system is NOT being used and there is a tie when a judge gave the same score to the tied competitors. The judge who gave the same score must select a winner. If the judge had to manually adjust his or her score due to the Maximum Deviation Rule (See Article VII), then the judge must select the winner based on the unadjusted score. If the judge gave the same score to the two tied competitors, not as a result of the Maximum Deviation Rule (See Article VII), then he or she must select the winner. For example: o Judge 1 gave competitor A 9.99 and competitor B 9.98 – competitor A gets 1 point o Judge 2 gave competitor A 9.98 and competitor B 9.99 – competitor B gets 1 point o Judge 3 gave competitor A 9.96 and competitor B 9.96. Judge 3 must select the competitor who they believe did the best form or weapon routine and who they select will be the winner.  Total Score. This tiebreaker format is used with 5 or 7 judges and is the second method applied in the tie-breaker methodology. This step is only applied if the tie could not be broken using the majority of the judges. In this process the high and low scores (that were dropped) are added back in and will be used to total the overall score of each tied competitor. Example: Judge 1 Judge 2 Judge 3 Judge 4 Judge 5 Competitor A 9.99 9.97 9.98 9.99 9.96 Competitor B 9.98 9.99 9.97 9.96 9.99 Competitor C 9.97 9.98 9.99 9.98 9.98 The calculation of scoring rules is applied and competitor A has a score of 29.94 (24) having dropped Judge 1 and Judge 5 scores. Competitor B has a score of 29.94 (24) having dropped Judge 2 and Judge 4 scores. Competitor C has a score of 29.94 (24) having dropped Judge 3 and Judge 1. We first apply tie breaking methodology 1 which is the majority of judges. In this example, Judge 1 and Judge 4 gave the highest score to Competitor A; Judge 2 and Judge 5 gave their highest score to competitor B; and Judge 3 have the highest score to Competitor C. The majority of judge’s rule cannot break the tie so we must apply tie breaking methodology two which is sum of the judges scores. For competitor A we add back Judge 1 and Judge 5 and calculate a total score of 49.89 (39); competitor B we add back Judge 2 and Judge 4 and calculate a total score of 49.89 (39); and for competitor C we add back Judge 1 and Judge 3 and calculate a total score of 49.90 (40). Competitor C’s overall score is higher and is the winner. The following summarizes the methodology that will be used, with the initial total score is a tied score and is based on the number of judges. Three Judges: 1. Majority of the judge’s 2. Judges determine the winner 3. Re-run the tied competitors Five or Seven judges: Breaking a tie(s) with 5 or 7 judges will require the dropped judges score (low and high score) are included to break the tie(s). 1. Majority of all judge’s 2. Judges determine the winner (breaks ties – if same score given to 1 or more competitors) 3. Total score of all the judges 4. Re-run the tied competitors

Article VI. RELATIVE RANKING

Section 1 RELATIVE RANKING RULE

The Relative Ranking Rule has replaced the old “score-as-you-go” system in all divisions at all WKO tournaments. Since all competitors run their forms before anyone is scored, this system eliminates the possible disadvantage early-running competitors were subject to, and the scoring advantage last-running seeds may have enjoyed. In addition, it prevents judges from getting “boxed-in” by giving scores too high early on, and eliminates “scoring creep” where judges who starts with very low scores gradually raises his/her scores as the divisions progresses.

 

Section 2 HOW IT WORKS

For the Relative Ranking Rule to operate properly, all judges must use the scoring worksheets provided in the ring boxes. As each competitor runs their form, they are given a place number relative to the competitor who has already run. (For example, each judge gives the first competitor up a “1” next to his/her name on the worksheet.) The next competitor gets a “2” if their form isn’t as good; or if their form is better, they get a “1” and the first competitor get his “1” changed to a “2”. The third competitor then gets a number that grades his form relative to the first two, and so on down the division. When all competitors have run, each judge’s Worksheet will have all the competitor’s names listed in the order they ran, but with numbers next to their names that reflects their place relative to one another. EXAMPLE IF FOUR COMPETITORS ARE IN DIVISION JOHN DOE II 9.98 2nd BOB SMITH III 9.96 3rd KEN BLACK I 9.99 1st LARRY JAY IIII 9.95 4th The Centre Judge will then allow up to two minutes for the judges to assign decimal scores to each competitor based on their relative ranking. Each judge decides how high to score his number “1” competitor – usually a 9.99 or 9.98 in the black belt divisions – and assigns that score to the top competitor. The number “2” competitor will be scored one-hundredth lower at 9.98 or 9.97 (or even lower if the judge feels there was a great gap between the number “1” and number “2” competitors). Number “3” will get a score at least one-hundredth lower than number “2, and number “4” will get a score at least one-hundredth lower than number “3”. This is done until all the competitors are ranked relative to each other. None of the top four competitors ever receives the same score, and the top four scores a judge gives are only given once. A judge may give the same score to competitors he/she has ranked as “5” or lower, though it is discouraged unless there are many competitors in the division and giving incrementally lower scores would take the lowerranked competitors to scores that were undeservedly low. (Judges may prefer to use slash marks rather than numbers to rank each competitor: I, II, III, IIII and so on. By using this method, you do not have to mark out or erase as often, you only add slashes.) Once all judges are ready, the Centre Judge will have each competitor step forward as his or her scores are announced, using the Maximum Deviation Rule.

Article VII. Maximum Deviation Rule

Divisions with three officials will use the Maximum Deviation Rule. Since high and low scores are not dropped when three officials are used, the Maximum Deviation Rule has a similar effect of limiting the impact of a judge’s score that is significantly higher or lower than the other judge’s scores. This prevents a single score from being so high or so low that it controls the placing order. When a form or other performance is ready to be scored, the centre official will say “Ready”, then, “Check”, at which point the three judges show their score to each other only (not to the competitors or spectators). The centre official will then look at the 3 scores to determine which one is the middle score (for example, a 9.92, 9.96 and a 9.95 – the 9.95 is the middle score. The other 2 scores must be .02 from the middle score. So, in the example the 9.92 must be upgraded to 9.93. Other than this mandatory adjustment, a judge may not change his score. If no score is more than .02 higher or lower than the middle score, then there is no adjustment. After assuring that any necessary adjustment has been, made, the Chief Official then says, “Score”, and the scores to the audience, the competitors, and the scorekeeper as usual.

Article VIII. WKO FORMS AND WEAPONS DIVISIONS

Section 8.01 TRADITIONAL

These forms must capture the essence of classic martial arts movements, displaying the traditional techniques, stances, footwork, and weapons. Emphasis is placed on execution of technique, application of technique, balance, speed, power, solid stances, and focus. Forms may be unmodified or modified from what a system or school considers to be the original version of the form; however, performance of the following movements will result in a downgrade of the form, or upon unanimous vote of the judges, a “no score” as a form inappropriate for the division:

a) Movements that involve more than a 360-degree spin;

b) Require the body to be inverted more than parallel to the floor;

c) More than two kicks with the same leg without putting the foot down in between;

d) Front or back flips;

e) Cartwheels;

f) Front or side leg splits;

g) Releases of the weapon other than simple hand switches;

h) or any other gymnastic movements or extreme exhibitions of flexibility or agility with the body or weapon that are deemed in the opinion of the judges to be inappropriate for the division pursuant to the general guidelines set forth here. (EXCEPTION – A Forward Roll is a legal Traditional Technique.) Commentary There has been a great deal of debate among reputable martial artists regarding whether a form or series of moves are outside of the bounds of the Traditional Division. Because WKO is a tournament circuit open to all styles and schools (across the nation and around the world) and from which judges are utilized, each competitor must make his or her own decision regarding whether to include movements, which might be to be objectionable for the Traditional Division. Just like the extreme and creative competitors, the traditional competitors will try to extend the base of the rules that govern the traditional divisions to gain an advantage over their competition. If there is something performed in a traditional from or weapon division that is not covered by the above rules, the WKO Rules Officials will make the decisions if a technique is a legal or illegal move.

 

Section 8.02 CREATIVE

The Creative Division allows forms to include contemporary martial arts techniques that have evolved over the last 30 years. These may be added to a traditional form, or the form may be devised in its entirety by the competitor. The Creative Division was formerly known as the Open Division and before that the American Division. A form in the Creative Division must ONLY include techniques which originate from martial arts and like the Traditional Division, emphasis will be placed on execution of the techniques, application of the techniques, balance, speed, power, solid stances, and focus Spinning kicks, jump spinning kicks, flying kicks, multiple kicks, splits, weapon twirls, weapon releases, and other creative martial arts techniques are permitted. Performance of the following movements will result in a downgrade by the judges, or upon unanimous vote of the judges, a “no score” as a form inappropriate for the division:

a) Movements that involve more than a 360-degree spin;

b) require the body to be inverted more than parallel to the floor;

c) or are similar to movements found in gymnastics and/or non-martial arts disciplines;

d) or forms that meet the above definition of strictly traditional forms.

Although one creative move qualifies a competitor for the creative divisions, it should be expected that a creative form or weapon routine with multiple creative moves of good quality would prevail as the winner, assuming all other criteria is met. The following techniques are legal in the Creative Divisions and will be score as any other techniques (power, speed, balance, and proper execution):

a) Butterfly kick;

b) Illusion kick;

c) Forward Roll;

d) Kip Up.

Commentary The Creative Division is intended for those competitors who do not wish to compete with a strictly traditional form, and/or do not wish to compete against other participants who execute extreme gymnastic-type movements. Over the past several years, it was often observed that judging these “creative” forms in the same division with forms including extreme martial arts “tricks” was essentially comparing apples and oranges, and to be more fair to the participants these divisions should be separated. WKO has therefore created a separate “Extreme Division”, as detailed below, separate and distinct from the Creative Division, thus allowing the Creative Division to include only those forms with movements that originate more inherently from the classic martial arts systems. Regarding the Creative Weapons Divisions, it is important to note that any weapons movement shall NOT be a factor in determining whether the weapons form constitutes a Creative or Extreme Form. The determining factor shall be the particular body movements as defined below in the Extreme Divisions. Consequently, a Creative Weapons competitor is permitted to perform any weapons move (i.e., twirls, releases, spins, etc.), but is not permitted to perform “Extreme” body movements (i.e. flips, 540 and above spins, or any inverted body moves, etc.). Page | 28 WKO (North American Sport Karate Association) 600 Sherwood Rd, Shoreview, MN 55126 New Revisions The following are techniques that are legal in the Creative form/weapon divisions: Butterfly Kick, Illusion Kick, Forward Roll and Kip Up. They will be scored as any other techniques: power, speed, balance and proper execution.

 

Section 8.03 EXTREME

The Extreme Divisions allow the competitor to perform any movements whether they originate from traditional or contemporary martial arts systems or otherwise. However, (1) at least half of the form must originate from martial arts techniques, and (2) the competitor must execute at least one technique that involves an inverted move or greater than 360-degree spin. Emphasis is placed on:

a) the quality of execution of techniques and movements;

b) martial arts skills,

c) balance, speed, and power;

d) degree of difficulty;

e) and showmanship.

In addition, only those movements that portray a definite offensive or defensive martial arts purpose, or are included to illustrate extreme flexibility or agility, are allowed. Inclusion of other movements, or the performance of a form or weapon from meeting the criteria above for a Traditional or Creative form, will result in a down grade by the judges, or upon a unanimous vote of the judges, a “no score” as a form inappropriate for the division. NOTE – Although one extreme move qualifies a competitor for the extreme divisions, it should be expected that an extreme form or weapon routine with multiple extreme moves of good quality would prevail as the winner, assuming all other criteria is met. Commentary: As martial arts evolves from the Traditional to Creative to Extreme, this category allows for the integration of techniques and movements from all martial art styles, gymnastics, acrobatics, dance, and athletic disciplines. If a competitor wishes to participate in a division with moves not permitted in the Traditional and Creative Divisions but meeting the guidelines described here, the competitor should compete in the Extreme Division.

 

Section 8.04 MUSICAL

The Musical Divisions requires an empty hand form or weapons form to meet all the above criteria for a Traditional, Creative, and Extreme form, and additionally meet the requirements of the “Divisional Music Rule” below.

 

Section 8.05 DIVISIONAL MUSIC RULE

Music Choreography should be judged as follows:

a) The movements of the form must be accented by and performed in conjunction with specific beats, notes, or words in the music. Simply performing your form to the same rhythm or cadence of a song is not satisfactory.

b) If sound effects are added to the music, the form should not solely be choreographed to the added sound effects.

c) Music and sound effects should appropriately match each other, and set the overall mood for each performance.

d) Overall, all music, and sound effects used, must compliment the form, and both the form and music should be judged together and viewed as an overall performance, not simply as a form performed with music playing.

Each competitor must provide a music player of reasonable and non-intrusive size at ringside to play his or her music, and an attendant at the player who must be present at all times during the performance (unless it is advertised that music players will be supplied). As each form begins, a music volume check must be made, during which time the player attendant will look to the centre judge for a nod of approval or a signal to lower the volume. Once this volume is set, it may not be increased during the performance of the form. Commentary: If a competitor chooses to use music in a grand championship division to a form that does not require music, the “Divisional Music Rule” does not apply. Commentary: If a competitor receives a “no score” decision by the judges because they feel the competitor’s form is not appropriate for the division, the competitor is not allowed to redo his/her form or weapon form in that division. It is the responsibility of the competitor to read and understand the rules of the division he/she is competing in before competition starts.

 

Section 8.06

Chinese A Form or Weapon routine in the Chinese Division can include techniques which originate from the style of martial arts the competitor represents and emphasis will be placed on execution of the techniques, application of the techniques, balance, speed, power, solid stances, and focus. The movement of the competitor will determine what WKO runoff or Grand the Chinese competitor will compete in. Movement of the following will place the Chinese Competitor in the WKO CMX (Creative, Musical, or Extreme) runoff / Grand: (a) Movements that involve more than a 360-degree spin; (b) require the body to be inverted more than parallel to the floor; (c) or are similar to movements found in gymnastics and/or non-martial arts disciplines; (a) Butterfly kick; (b) Illusion kick; (g) Kip Up. Should a Chinese competitor enter a WKO division that is not declared Chinese Division (Musical, Creative or Extreme, the competitor must follow the standard rules for that Division. Music is not allowed in the Chinese Divisions, as WKO offers a Musical Division for both Forms and Weapons. Section 8.07 Kenpo or Kempo There are various styles of Kenpo and Kempo that can compete in this division. Although consideration should be given if the system / style is related to Chinese origin / style, then the competitor may elect to compete in the Chinese Division. A Form or Weapon routine in the Kenpo or Kempo Division can include techniques which originate from the style of martial arts the competitor represents and emphasis will be placed on execution of the techniques, application of the techniques, balance, speed, power, solid stances, and focus. The movement of the competitor will determine what WKO runoff or Grand the Kenpo or Kempo competitor will compete in. Movement of the following will place the Kenpo or Kempo Competitor in the WKO CMX (Creative, Musical, or Extreme) runoff / Grand: (d) Movements that involve more than a 360-degree spin; (e) require the body to be inverted more than parallel to the floor; (f) or are similar to movements found in gymnastics and/or non-martial arts disciplines; (c) Butterfly kick; (d) Illusion kick; (h) Kip Up. Should a Kenpo or Kempo competitor enter a WKO division that is not declared Kenpo or Kempo Division (Musical, Creative or Extreme, the competitor must follow the standard rules for that Division. Music is not allowed in the Kenpo or Kempo Divisions, as WKO offers a Musical Division for both Forms and Weapons. Section 8.08 GRAND CHAMPIONSHIPS AND OVERALL GRAND CHAMPIONSHIPS All competitors must compete in any Grand Championship and/or Overall Grand Championship with the style of forms or weapons (not exact form or weapon) they won with in their division (EXAMPLE – A winner of a creative form cannot compete with an extreme form in the grand championships) If a competitor wins more than one division, they have the option to select the style of form or weapon of the divisions they won. All competitors may use music in all Overall Weapons and Forms Grand Championships and Overall Grand Championships runoffs. Youth Weapons and Forms Grand Championships, music may only be used by competitors in the CMX Youth Grand Championships (this includes creative and extreme winners). To Compete in an 18+ Divisional Grand Championships, Overall Grand Championships, and/or Runoff in Forms, Weapons and/or Sparring, a competitor must have won an 18+ Division. NOTE – New Traditional Challenge Division. A 30 and older competitors can compete in the 18+ Traditional Challenge and still compete in their regular 30+ Form Weapon’s Division.

 

Section 8.09 WEAPON BREAKS OR AND WEAPON CRACKS

a) A competitor will be disqualified if he/she breaks their weapon, separates into 2 or more pieces. b) If the Weapon cracks, does not separate, the competitor may continue the routine and will not be disqualified. The competitor may have their score lowered, if in the opinion of the judges, the Crack impacted the execution of the form or the effectiveness of the weapon.

 

Section 8.10 LOSS OF WEAPON CONTROL IN FINALS AND OVERALL RUN-OFFS

a) Loss of Control is divided into three categories and penalties: I. Category 1 = bobble but no interruption of form = .01 to .03 deduction (Discretion of the judges) II. Category 2 = form interrupted (usually a drop) = .05 deduction III. Category 3 = if the weapons goes out of bounds and/or off platform, or the competitor strikes a spectator, judge, or other person with the weapon regardless of intent = disqualification

b) Deductions are mandatory, and each judge deducts from his or her score before figuring their Relative Ranking order.

c) If a competitor drops their weapons twice they will be disqualified.

d) Score after deductions is subject to adjustment by Maximum Deviation Rule (See Article VII) just like any other score.

e) If Category 1 or 2 occurs, competitor may continue and be scored, or may bow out and not be scored or placed. (b) Disqualification for Category 3 is decision of Centre Official or a majority of other judges. Judges only conference is held as soon as weapon goes out of bounds.

f) A cracked or broken weapon is treated as a loss of control. If the break or crack prevents the weapon from being used as intended, it is a Category 3.

g) Rule is used during finals and overall runoffs in all black belt divisions. h) In all regular eliminations, Weapon Divisions, a competitor will be disqualified if they drop a weapon and no points or placement is awarded. CLASSICAL KATA – TRADITIONAL CHALLENGE FORM

 

Section 8.11 OVERVIEW AND INTENT

The Classical Kata (Traditional Challenge Divisions) will showcase the patterns of recognized Karate systems from Japan (Shotokan, Shito-Ryu, Goju-Ryu, Wado-Ryu, Chito-Ryu) and Okinawa (Shorin-Ryu, Isshin-Ryu, Goju-Ryu, Uechi-Ryu). Competitors must perform a recognized unaltered/unmodified kata from one of the above systems and no additions or deletions of movements are allowed. School variations are permitted provided the movements maintain the structural integrity of the original kata. Commentary Unlike the Japanese/Okinawan division (WKO), competitors must only perform unmodified katas from Japanese or Okinawan Karate systems. Competitors who choose to alter/modify a classical working or add/delete moves are strongly encouraged to enter the WKO Japanese/Okinawan division as such changes to the kata will result in disqualification in the Traditional Challenge division.

 

Section 8.12 SPECIFIC CRITERIA

Although Okinawan and Japanese styles have many stylistic similarities, the following subtle differences must be observed: a. Japanese styles (i.e. Shotokan, Wado-Ryu, and Kyukoshinkai) generally have: i. lower chamber, longer and wider stances (especially zenkutsu-dachi); ii. horse stances with toes pointing parallel (kiba dachi); iii. emphasis on use of back stance (or kokutsu dachi); iv. and thrusting kicks with maximum height to the competitor own chin. b) Okinawan styles (i.e. Shorin-Ryu, Isshin-Ryu, and Ryuei-Ryu) generally have: i. higher chamber; ii. higher and shorter stances (more use of natural stance and sanchin dachi); iii. horse stances with toes pointing outward (shiko dachi); iv. emphasis on use of cat stance (neko ashi dachi); v. and snap kicks with maximum height to the competitor own chest.

 

Section 8.13 COMPETITION ATTIRE

Competitors must wear a clean, all white traditional uniform. Sleeve length must pass the elbows, uniform bottoms must be past (below) the knee in length. Competitor must wear black belt.

 

Section 8.14 KEY ELEMENTS OF SCORING

Competitors will be judged/scored on focus (kime), proper execution of technique (punches, kicks, and stances), proper breathing and hip rotation. Judges take into account and evaluate the competitor on:

a) basic techniques, stances, punches, blocks and kicks executed with balance, strength and focus;

b) Eyes (Visual Expression of the Competitor);

c) The Pace of the Kata, Breathing (Proper Exhalation);

d) and focus of attention (chakugan).

The competitor must have an understanding of application (bunkai) and the criteria specific to the individual kata. Specifics:

a) Kia – Minimum of two (2), Maximum of four (4);

b) Kicks – Standing kicks must not go above the competitor’s shoulder;

c) Stances must not break parallel.

 

Section 8.15 SCORING/OFFICIATING

Five judges are the standard numbers of judges that will be used; however, it is acceptable to use only three judges. If (5) judges are used, the highest and lowest scores will be dropped and the remaining three scores will be added together. A scoring range of 9.90 to 9.99 will be used in the eliminations; a range of 9.96 to 10 will be used in the finals. Seating in all four (4) corners, centre referee located in the middle.

 

Section 8.16 PROCEDURE

The following procedures will be used by the Officials.

a) Seeds are selected, per WKO Seeding Rules, see Article XII.

b) The remaining Competitors will be shuffled to determine the order. Centre Judge is responsible for this task.

c) Time Limit: 4 minutes, the clock starts when competitor enters the ring. The competitor will bow in and announce the name of the Kata only. He or she will be recognized by the centre judge and the kata may begin.

 

Section 8.17 OFFICIAL’S DUTIES IN PROCEDURE

a) One Official is designated to count the Kia;

b) One official will watch for the height of the kick;

c) The Centre Official (who is the highest most experienced rank) will raise a hand if the form is indeed traditional.

d) Upon approval, the judges will make notes on their board as to how they will score.

e) After seeing all the competitors, scoring begins for each competitor.

f) Competitors will line-up in the order they competed in to be scored.

g) Disqualified competitors receive no score.

 

Section 8.18 DISQUALIFICATION

Competitors may be disqualified for one of the following:

a) Doing a non-traditional form (altered or made up);

b) Kia rule not followed (too many or not enough);

c) Out of bounds;

d) Sportsmanship not adhered to;

e) Excessive stance violation.

 

Section 8.19 KATA LIST

The list of katas below are the ones recognized by the WKF and JKF for the four major styles of Japanese Karate (Goju, Shito, Wado and Shotokan) and the Okinawan Prefecture Karate Rengokai for the Okinawan styles (Goju, Shorin, Uechi, Isshin and Ryuei-Ryu). Only the Katas listed below can be performed. Style-specific alternate names are also indicated. School variations are permitted. However, alterations and modifications including (but not limited) to adding or deleting movements or altering the structure of the classical form are not permitted. Annan Annanko Aoyagi Bassai/Passai – Matsumura Bassai/Passai – Tomari Bassai/Passai Dai Bassai/Passai Sho Chinte Chinto – Tomari (Shotokan: Gankaku Sho) Chinto (Shotokan: Gankaku) Fukyu (all versions) Gekisai 1 and 2 Gojushiho Dai Gojushiho Sho Hakutsuru/Hakucho Hangetsu Heiku Jiin Jion Jitte Juroku Kanchin Kanku Dai (Shorin-Ryu Kusanku Dai or Shito-Ryu Kosokun Dai) Kanku Sho (Shorin-Ryu Kusanku Sho or Shito-Ryu Kosokun Sho) Kanshiwa Kanshu Kosokunshiho (Shito-Ryu) Kururunfa Kusanku – Chatanyara Meikyo Nipaipo (Standard Shito Ryu version only) / Nijuhachiho (Shotokan) Niseishi (Shotokan : Nijushiho) Paiku Paipuren Pinan / Heian 1 – 5 Rohai Saifa Sanchin Sanseiru Sanseiru (Uechi-Ryu version) Seichin Seipai Seirui Seisan (all versions) Seiunchin Shinpa Shishochin Sochin (Shotokan and Shito-Ryu versions) Sunsu (Isshin Ryu) Suparinpei/Peichurrin Taikyoku (all versions) Tekki 1 – 3 (Okinawan: Naihanchi) Tensho Unshu (Shito Ryu) Unsu (Shotokan) Wankan (Shotokan) Wankan (Shito Ryu: Matsukaze) Wansu (Shotokan : Empi)